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Panel Debate: Communicating Climate Change

OSLO, Norway, Oct. 31 - /EWire/ -- The Center for International Climate and Environmental Research (CICERO) is organizing the panel debate "Communicating Climate Change" during the United Nations climate conference in Nairobi in November. The aim of this event is to discuss to what degree the general public still has the impression that climate scientists strongly disagree about the extent to which climate change is human induced, and what may have caused this impression. Has the journalists' struggle to achieve a balanced presentation given the so-called climate skeptics greater journalistic coverage than they deserve? Or are the majority of climate scientists simply unable to communicate their message effectively? What concrete steps can be taken to reduce the problems with respect to communication? Time and location : Tuesday, 14 November 2006, 15:15-16:45, African Tulip Tree, United Nations Climate Change Conference - Nairobi. Download the program for the panel debate United Nations Climate Change Conference - Nairobi 2006 Speakers Rajendra K. Pachauri, Chairman, Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change (IPCC). What are the main challenges and bottlenecks in communicating the IPCC's assessment reports? Pandaring l Prestrud, Director CICERO and vice chair Arctic Climate Impacts Assessment (ACIA). Experiences from ACIA information work and the media coverage of the ACIA report compared to the IPCC assessment reports. Nick Nuttall, Spokesperson United Nations Environment Programme (UNEP). How clear and simple does a message has to be to reach the public? Jules Boykoff, Assistant Professor, Department of Politics and Government at Pacific University, Oregon. Journalistic Balance as Global Warming Bias - Creating controversy where science finds consensus. Liisa Antilla, Human Geographer. What role do US mainstream media play in the dissemination of misinformation about climate change? Discussion leader Alister Doyle, Environmental journalist, Reuters. Additional reading "Global Warming: An Inconvenient Principle". Jules Boykoff and Maxwell Boykoff. Common Dreams, 6 July 2006. "Warm Words: How are we telling the climate story and can we tell it better?" (. Gill Ereaut and Nat Segnit. Institute for Public Policy Research, August 2006. "Yelling 'Fire' on a Hot Planet". Andrew C. Revkin, The New York Times, April 23 2006. "The Next Big Storm: can scientists and journalists work together to improve coverage of the hurricane-global warming controversy?". CSICOP, 3 August 2006. "Scientists fear new attempts to undermine climate action". The Guardian, 21 April 2006. "Climate of scepticism: US newspaper coverage of the science of climate change". Liisa Antilla. Global Environmental Change Part A Volume 15, Issue 4, December 2005. "Journalistic Balance as Global Warming Bias - Creating controversy where science finds consensus". Jules Boykoff and Maxwell Boykoff. Fair, November 2004. "A Challenge to Journalists Who Cover Global Warming". Sen. James Inhofe. October 24 2006. About the organizer CICERO This side event is organized by Center for International Climate and Environmental Research - Oslo (CICERO). CICERO's mission is to provide reliable and comprehensive knowledge about all aspects of the climate change problem. Contact Info: Petter Haugneland Information Officer Center for International Climate and Environmental Research - Oslo (CICERO) Website : Center for International Climate and Environmental Research

For more information:

Petter Haugneland Information Officer Center for International Climate and Environmental Research - Oslo (CICERO)

www.cicero.uio.no/index_e.asp

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